Attracting Young Readers to the Library

Baker & Taylor college library shoot 4/11/14.

Research shows that more young people are visiting the library. In 2016, the Pew Research Center found that 53% of Millennials (those aged 18 to 35 at the time) reported using a library or bookmobile in the previous 12 months. That compares with 45% of Gen Xers, 43% of Baby Boomers and 36% of those in the Silent Generation. The survey focused specifically on public libraries.

It’s exciting news for libraries. But more work remains left to be done, particularly with reaching out to potential patrons who don’t use the library. At least, not yet. How do we encourage these younger readers to return again and again?

Innovate your offerings.

In addition to discovering titles and authors, patrons can find a wealth of new offerings.

For example:

Go outside the library.

In addition to serving patrons who already visit the library, it is imperative that public library systems reach out to those who don’t even come through the door.

bandt-0354 pop up library logo cmyk

One way is to use a Pop Up Library, such as that available from Baker & Taylor, because it lets the library take programming to a captive audience. Pop Up Library is a small network device with one dedicated purpose—to instantly deliver ebooks to readers wherever libraries choose. Libraries that use Pop Up Library are able to extend the reach of their digital collection across the community so material is accessible to all. Click here to watch the promo video  and learn more! 

#Libraries! 

Smart library systems are harnessing social media to attract new audiences. Think Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram just to start.

Social media helps libraries to tell their system’s unique story, and explain the value they are providing in a more consistent voice. YouTube, for example is a great place to share library experiences.  View The New York Public Library’s YouTube channel to see what they are doing.  Online chat features can connect patrons with librarians who can not only provide information but help build a relationship.

Turn new visitors into repeat ones.

CHQ-Logo_COLOR_WHITE-BACKGROUNDNew programming and outreach may bring more visitors into the library, but equally important is getting these newcomers to register with the library and return. collectionHQ’s Experimental Placement can help. This tool helps libraries track how well special displays and collections are resonating with patrons to inform shelving and content placement to better enhance the patron’s experience.

“I’m a big fan of studying the demographics and the sociographics of the culture of a community,” explains Amandeep Kochar, Executive Vice President – Sales, Product Management, Services and Technology Ops at Baker & Taylor. “As that is changing, and changing very actively, I think the task of attracting people to the library, particularly younger people, is becoming more difficult as the fabric of society changes. Oftentimes, the library needs tools in order to promote their services and tell their stories because they are fighting for the same eyeballs as some of the big corporations out there. And the library has to be equipped with the tools to effectively compete for the time from the current generation and the upcoming generation.”

Want to learn more? Visit collectionHQ’s website at collectionhq.com

 

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